The Stone Foxes

The Stone Foxes were the first guests on our show when we started in October 2016 and so it’s fitting that they chose the podcast to be the swansong for the current iteration of the band.
As is often the case for musicians, life can get in the way of the pursuit of one’s passion and some of the guys have decided to move on. Frontman Shannon will keep the Foxes going but they’ll look a little different when they return in 2019.
In the meantime, we were thrilled that they said their goodbyes on our show, rocking the T-Mobile Signature Store in downtown San Francisco and treating the crowd to a raw and emotional good time. Oh, this one gets a little loud!!

 

FREE: The Stone Foxes in Song & Conversation Nov 7th 6:00-7:30pm

Invite - T-Mobile _ The Stone Foxes (RENEE_GREG)

Join us for another FREE evening of amazing music and conversation as we take the podcast to the T-Mobile Signature Store in downtown San Francisco with our favorite local rockers The Stone Foxes. RSVP by leaving a message here telling us how many you’ll be our head to our Facebook event page.

The core of any rock band worth their salt is a deep respect for the fundamentals – a feel that’s redolent of the scare-the-parents, back country, wild juke joint origins – and an abiding drive to carve out one’s own unique territory. The friction between these impulses is where good things happen, and it’s the place San Francisco’s The Stone Foxes – spear headed by brothers Shannon Koehler (drums, harp, vocals) and Spence Koehler (lead guitar, vocals) ) – have resided since their 2008 debut, young men dedicated to keeping rock engaged and succulently alive.

“You do what the song needs you to do. That’s how this band does it,” says Shannon. “Hell, that’s how The Band did it! You can go back to Muddy Waters and further for examples of this. With us, there’s this filter of blues and roots that we’ve created by soaking up that music, and when we write everything gets put through that filter. It comes out as who we are today, but everything we do goes through that filter, this cultural fuzzbox.”